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READER CLAUDIO FERRARI WRITES ABOUT THE SWISS ARTIST:

I’ve been following Angela’s work since the early nineties, when I first met her in Bern. She had been active in doing art all through the eighties, while living in Basel. Back then, trying to create form by accentuating the line, Angela was taking both painting and paintress into some sort of a collision course. “All three” were frustrated, I dare now say: Angela could fulfill neither her deep need for harmony nor her (romantic?) attitude to make life act in unison with work. Her art could even have taken the unexpected path of comic strip art, ( “wood for tomorrow” made me think of Joan of Arc collecting her own firewood…). The very painting support helped her in choosing lyricism instead of narrative… this is what I like to think anyway. The paintress in Angela was bursting with energy, which threatened with all sorts of retaliations ( social, fisical, emotional), if not properly employed. The triad had to come together, strike a balance, somehow.

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The second studio in Lugano, where Angela has been working for the past 15 years or so, has favoured a process in which Angela’s character, the body of her ouvre and the paintress’s talent have managed to grow together, in admirable synergy. A new triad, light colour and space, which in the visual arts constitute the integrity for “Art Supreme”, gradually was born from the old one. Around the turn of the millenium, after having tried several artistic approaches (and not without a lot of work and struggle!) Angela Lyn blossomed, and blossomed again, and blossomed blossomed. Angela has not let go of the power she had generated since those days; she doesn’t intend to either : take a look at her latest large scale paintings! Angela’s work has reached an esthetical indipendence from its maker, excellent qualification for Art Supreme. Such an objectivation is not a matter of fact in today’s art , where the work doesn’t easily detach itself from its author, on the contrary, tends to cling on to the maker and to the event through which it has been powered.

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So Angela started painting spoons, petals, nutshells. She painted delicatly, giving a simple Knife or a glove or a shoe a bath of light, colour and space. With great gentleness she was tackling my problem head on. I had been experiencing a difficulty in relating to objects for a very long time, maybe I was naive, maybe younger. Maybe I had been overexposing myself to the german culture, where the “object” becomes a “Gegenstand”, literally something which stands in front/against you, something one’s deals very directly with… “Her desire is to restore a sense of being to things, that our overburdoned powers of perception have lost”. So Dr. Cäsar Menz in 2000. “…seemingly unassuming objects are imbued with human experience, whilst they trascend the personal reference frame. Through this dialoge, Angela’s brush let’s mere objects become custodians of culture”. So Max Koos in 2009. When my wife proposed to purchase “talking through cedars V”, I welcomed the initiative. The painting belonged to a series of five, measuring each 180x 45 cm. I confided Angela would talk to me, through the cedars…would help me establish a better relashionship with my surrounding. Isn’t this a plausible funcion for art, when the personal psychological need of the artist meets a collective psychological need ?

Every work of art brings a surprise, something unexpected discards the expectations. Every work of art encourages an “upside down fruition”, forces the viewer to review his own position. living with Angela’s painting did not carry the sort of message I was expecting, I had rather the feeling, it didn’t want to communicate anything at all. The painting remained absolutely mute, shut in a silence verging on ostility. ” Talking through cedars V” revealed itself to be as silent as a grave. If a grave is there to legitimazize death and to help the living to come to terms with it, this work of art, which turned before my eyes into another purchased object, pretended to defy death through its mere presence. I guess the problem was all mine: to cut the long story short, I couldn’t confront myself with the intensity of the artwork. My wife shook her head, I think she was putting an effort into understanding this.

Angela did try to send a warning, via an introductory note on one of her catalogues: “Whilst looking carefully, the fragility of one’s existence is slowly exposed.” I guess I found that out, eventually. There a message ! If I ever was looking for one. The story has a happy ending though: An important institution subsequently purchased “talking through cedars I,II, III and IV” for its private collection. The curators where more than pleased, to have the fifth piece as well. So the five canvasses are together again now, perhaps delighting casual visitors in an elegant waiting room, perhaps witnessing over major international transactions, perhaps descreetly dominating over the big boss office, even nagging away at his soul…perhaps… One for sure: “talking through cedars I,II, III, IV & V” all lived happily ever after…silently…defying death.